Foreword

I am proud to preface this sixth edition of the Union-wide Ten-Year Network Development Plan for gas. This TYNDP 2020 aims to support the European Climate and Energy ambitions, including the Green Deal and the European strategies for Hydrogen and Energy System Integration. I truly believe that the Ten-Year Network Development Plan 2020 delivers added-value to a wide range of stakeholder and decision-makers.

This TYNDP process has been delivered to you in a changing and important context for the role of gas in the European energy sector. The tasks for the ­infrastructure operators include as a major focus not only the security of supply but also the sustainability agenda.

The European gas infrastructure has seen decades of development and the existing international gas system already ensures a high level of market integration across most of Europe. The gas transmission infrastructure, LNG terminals and gas storages provide safe, reliable and affordable low carbon ­energy to European citizens. Furthermore, the gas infrastructure offers exceptional and cost-efficient opportunities for the EU to develop intermittent ­renewables and decarbonised gases at large scale, to meet European climate and energy goals.

TYNDP 2020 concludes that almost all gas infrastructure gaps can be addressed in the next 5 years by projects already initiated, including supply route disruptions. These investments will be mostly commissioned before 2025 and will bring affordable, ­diversified and competitive supplies of gas, increasingly decarbonised over time. However, it should be noted that, in specific areas, further development of the infrastructure is still required. It is particularly important for those areas in the context of evolving Member States decisions on their energy mix and embrace the decarbonisation agenda.

ENTSOG has undertaken significant changes to ­further improve the TYNDP, to meet stakeholders’ feedback and to better interlink it with the electricity system. ENTSOG has worked on holistic scenarios, considering the full European energy system, built in cooperation with ENTSO-E to represent ­differentiated paths towards achieving the EU ­decarbonisation targets. For the first time TYNDP 2020 includes COP21 compliant scenarios, building on a carbon budget approach to reach Net-Zero 2050. Additionally, a national policy scenario, National Trends, was built to reflect the respective Member States’ National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs).

The Hybrid Energy Infrastructure, building on both electricity and gas systems as the cross-border ­energy carriers will enable delivery of more ­efficient, resilient, sustainable and faster and cheaper decarbonisation of the European energy sector. The joint efforts with stakeholders contributing to this ­TYNDP, shows the aim of the European energy ­players to work closely together to meet EU climate goals.

ENTSO-E and ENTSOG have developed this TYNDP 2020 building on the expertise and cooperation of more than 90 TSO experts from all over Europe. This work has resulted in the first ever full energy scenarios at European and national level with the highest level of transparency including numerous workshops and dialogue with stakeholders. This has been done with the objective to support the ­European energy and climate ambitions and in the European citizens’ best social-economic welfare ­interests.

For the next TYNDP 2022, ENTSOG will internalise the Green Deal priorities, including EC Hydrogen and ESI Strategies, and furthermore, ENTSOG plans to organise deeper stakeholder involvement in planning process (DSOs, hydrogen producers /consumers, RES-E producers, NGOs, and others).

To streamline stakeholders’ cooperation and as proposed to the European Commission and to all participants of last Copenhagen Infrastructure ­Forum, ENTSOG has suggested to establish Joint Advisory Panel for Scenarios (together with ­ENTSO-E) to facilitate neutrality and to improve transparency.

Transparency and cooperation between gas, ­hydrogen and electricity value chains is crucial, specifically in the context of a future European Hydrogen Backbone. ENTSOG is ready to facilitate coordinated development of the EU wide hydrogen backbone via ENTSOG’s TYNDP process, ensuring speed and scale in hydrogen grid development. ENTSOG finds that this should start now and that it will contribute to the delivery of the EU Recovery Plan objectives.

On behalf of ENTSOG, I would like to thank all ­parties involved in the TYNDP 2020 process. I encourage you to provide your feedback through our upcoming consultation process to ensure full transparency in the process. This feedback, together with the ACER Opinion, will be duly considered before ­releasing the TYNDP final version in March 2021.

Jan Ingwersen
JI Sign

Jan Ingwersen
ENTSOG General Director

This TYNDP process has been delivered to you in a changing and important context for the role of gas in the European energy sector. The tasks for the ­infrastructure operators include as a major focus not only the security of supply but also the sustainability agenda.

The European gas infrastructure has seen decades of development and the existing international gas system already ensures a high level of market integration across most of Europe. The gas transmission infrastructure, LNG terminals and gas storages provide safe, reliable and affordable low carbon ­energy to European citizens. Furthermore, the gas infrastructure offers exceptional and cost-efficient opportunities for the EU to develop intermittent ­renewables and decarbonised gases at large scale, to meet European climate and energy goals.

TYNDP 2020 concludes that almost all gas infrastructure gaps can be addressed in the next 5 years by projects already initiated, including supply route disruptions. These investments will be mostly commissioned before 2025 and will bring affordable, ­diversified and competitive supplies of gas, increasingly decarbonised over time. However, it should be noted that, in specific areas, further development of the infrastructure is still required. It is particularly important for those areas in the context of evolving Member States decisions on their energy mix and embrace the decarbonisation agenda.

ENTSOG has undertaken significant changes to ­further improve the TYNDP, to meet stakeholders’ feedback and to better interlink it with the electricity system. ENTSOG has worked on holistic scenarios, considering the full European energy system, built in cooperation with ENTSO-E to represent ­differentiated paths towards achieving the EU ­decarbonisation targets. For the first time TYNDP 2020 includes COP21 compliant scenarios, building on a carbon budget approach to reach Net-Zero 2050. Additionally, a national policy scenario, National Trends, was built to reflect the respective Member States’ National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs).

The Hybrid Energy Infrastructure, building on both electricity and gas systems as the cross-border ­energy carriers will enable delivery of more ­efficient, resilient, sustainable and faster and cheaper decarbonisation of the European energy sector. The joint efforts with stakeholders contributing to this ­TYNDP, shows the aim of the European energy ­players to work closely together to meet EU climate goals.

ENTSO-E and ENTSOG have developed this TYNDP 2020 building on the expertise and cooperation of more than 90 TSO experts from all over Europe. This work has resulted in the first ever full energy scenarios at European and national level with the highest level of transparency including numerous workshops and dialogue with stakeholders. This has been done with the objective to support the ­European energy and climate ambitions and in the European citizens’ best social-economic welfare ­interests.

For the next TYNDP 2022, ENTSOG will internalise the Green Deal priorities, including EC Hydrogen and ESI Strategies, and furthermore, ENTSOG plans to organise deeper stakeholder involvement in planning process (DSOs, hydrogen producers /consumers, RES-E producers, NGOs, and others).

To streamline stakeholders’ cooperation and as proposed to the European Commission and to all participants of last Copenhagen Infrastructure ­Forum, ENTSOG has suggested to establish Joint Advisory Panel for Scenarios (together with ­ENTSO-E) to facilitate neutrality and to improve transparency.

Transparency and cooperation between gas, ­hydrogen and electricity value chains is crucial, specifically in the context of a future European Hydrogen Backbone. ENTSOG is ready to facilitate coordinated development of the EU wide hydrogen backbone via ENTSOG’s TYNDP process, ensuring speed and scale in hydrogen grid development. ENTSOG finds that this should start now and that it will contribute to the delivery of the EU Recovery Plan objectives.

On behalf of ENTSOG, I would like to thank all ­parties involved in the TYNDP 2020 process. I encourage you to provide your feedback through our upcoming consultation process to ensure full transparency in the process. This feedback, together with the ACER Opinion, will be duly considered before ­releasing the TYNDP final version in March 2021.

TYNDP 2020

The European gas infrastructure has seen decades of investment and ­development. The gas system connects most of European countries, ensuring the most efficient solution for transporting and storing large amounts of ­energy over long periods and distances.

The current gas infrastructure has achieved the internal ­energy market in most parts of Europe

TYNDP 2020 confirms the strong resilience of the gas infrastructure in terms of Security of Supply and its ability to enable efficient competition and market integration, provided there is no market distortion. However, some specific areas still show investement needs and the projects addressing these needs have either made their final investment decision (FID) or they have reached an advanced stage of development and are planned to be commissioned within the next 5 years.

The gas system is in transition towards net-zero 2050

The current gas infrastructure can already support the phase out of carbon intensive fuels in carbon intensive sectors such as industry and transport sectors, but also in the power sector. However, more investments in renewables, ­decarbonisation and infrastructure conversion are needed. Energy Transition (ETR) ­projects demonstrate their ability to decarbonise the energy system and next editions of the TYNDP will continue to assess them.

TYNDP 2020 confirms the interdependence of the electricity and gas sectors and the benefits of quick-wins to ­decarbonise the European energy system

In a net-zero future, hydrogen and biomethane play a key role in the decarbonisation. Indeed, the gas system needs clean hydrogen from ­intermittent renewable sources, like wind and ­solar, to decarbonise; and the electricity system needs decarbonised gas to support and secure the significant development of the electricity ­demand in any of the scenarios.

Furthermore, ready-to-implement solutions with no (or limited) investment like coal to gas switch in the power sector could already save more than 85 MtCO₂ year, and will reduce the need for further investment in decarbonisation post 2050.

The European gas system is one of the key ­players in achieving the ­European energy and climate targets. The gas infrastructure offers unique ­opportunities – in energy storage, ­transmission and integration of ­renewables – to support the decarbonisation of the overall ­energy system in a cost effective, secure and achievable way.

Figure 1: EU gas system 2020 at a sight